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Author Archives: Kundan Kidney Care

Categories Health, Kidney Diet, Kundan Kidney Care Centre, Risk Factors

How to Prevent Kidney Stones

If you have ever had a kidney stone you know the experience can be extremely unpleasant.  Did you know that over the course of lifetime, one in ten people will have a kidney stone?

If your doctor suspects you have a kidney stone, you may be asked to have diagnostic tests done.

  1. Blood Testing: Too much calcium or uric acid in your blood could be of concern. Blood test may also help monitor the health of your kidneys.
  2. Urine Testing: A 24 Hour urine collection test may reveal that you are exreting too many stone forming minerals.
  3. Ultra-sound Scanning: Imaging tests may show kidney stones in your urinary tract.
  4. Passed Stones Analysis: Your passed stone may reveal the makeup of your kidney stones.

Prevention of kidney stones may include a combination of lifestyle changes and medication.

Drink Fluid: People with the history of kidney stones are recommended to drink about 2.5 liters of water per day. If you live in a hot dry climate and sweat a lot then you may need to drink even more water so that you produce enough urine. A light and clear urine indicate that you are drinking enough water.

Oxalate-Rich Foods: Your doctor may ask you to prevent oxalate rich foods. Cutting oxalate rich food may sound logical but this  may not be smart for an overall health perspective. Eat and drink calcium and oxalate rich foods together during a meal. Doing so, they are more likely to bind in the stomach and intestines before they kidneys begin processing.

Diet Selection: Reduce the amount of salt and choose non-animal protein sources. Consider using a salt substitute such as herbs or spices.

Manage underlying Medical Problems: Some medical conditions like obesity, high blood pressure and diabetes can raise your risk for kidney stones.

Treatment may be required if the diet and drinking water does not work. Consult us for further information. There are herbal and safer ways to address this problem.

Categories Health, Kidney Diet, Kidney Disease

Pre-Dialysis Diet

Patients with kidney disease need to be careful about their food choices to avoid excess wastes and fluid from building up. With the progression of the disease, the dietary needs may vary. The intent of doing this is to

• reduce the workload of kidneys
• preserve the kidney function that is left

It will be important for you to understand how to eat well and how to get the right amount of protein, minerals to maintain a healthy weight and manage your fluid balance.

The goal is to delay the onset for the need of dialysis, minimizing failing kidney symptoms such as uremia and maintaining an optimal health.

General Diet Guidelines:

1. Protein: Protein needs for a kidney patient in not requiring dialysis would be less than those having dialysis. In the early stages of CKD, the kidneys are still able to work however, need to work much harder to remove all the waste. Consuming food rich in protein may lead to overworked kidneys causing more damage to the kidneys.
Eating less Protein helps to preserve kidney function and prevent additional damage to the kidneys.

To calculate the recommended intake of protein, you can multiple your weight with 0.8gms/kilogram.

e.g. A person weighing 52 kg will require 52 x 0.8 = 42gms of protein/day

2. Potassium: It is important to check your blood report to see if your potassium is beyond the range. An optimal potassium range is 3.5 – 5.0 mg/dl
if the reading shows high potassium, avoid the following food items:

• wholegrain cereals, bread and biscuits
• fruits and vegetables from the high potassium group e.g. banana
• canned fruits and vegetable, juices, milk, wine
• nuts, seeds

3. Sodium: The main source of sodium is salt. This should be avoided regardless of the kidney disease. Salt is found in almost all the packaged and processed foods.

Salt makes to feel thirsty which will result in drinking more fluid. Sodium restriction in kidney disease helps to maintain normal fluid balance.

4. Phosphorus: With the lack of kidney function, blood phosphate level may also rise. When it begins to build up in the blood, calcium is drawn from the bone. This may lead to joint pain, eye irritation, itchiness and hardening blood vessels.

Here is a list of food rich in phosphorus:

• dairy products
• dark sodas
• nuts and peanut butter
• beer
• legumes
• organ meats