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Category Archives: Risk Factors

Categories Health, Kidney Disease, Kundan Kidney Care Centre, Risk Factors

Kidney Disease and Edema

Kidney patients often have to deal with water retention, causing swelling or puffiness of the tissue especially in legs, arms or under the eyes.

A quick test to see if you have water retention is to press the affected area for a few seconds and see if the skin retains a dimple. Other symptoms may include:

  • Shortness of breath (especially when lying down)
  • Difficulty breathing
  • Chest pain

These conditions may require immediate attention. In many cases, your doctor may prescribe you a diuretic, also known as water pills.

As our body is made-up of almost 80 percentage of water, kidneys play an important role in the health of our body.

The kidneys and the adrenal glands are responsible for cleansing the blood, produce needed hormones, and regulate blood pressure and mineral balance.

If left untreated, edema can cause:

  • Stiffness
  • Increased risk of skin ulcers
  • Painful swelling
  • Risk of infection
  • Decreased blood circulation
  • High blood pressure

If you are healthy, it may be possible to try home remedies to address edema however, if you are a kidney patient, it is not a good idea to try things that may cause more damage to the kidneys then offering any good. It is essential to consultant a professional to address this issue.

At Kundan Kidney Care Centre we can help you understand the cause and remedy for edema.

We offer safe and natural treatment for kidney disease. Please contact us via phone or email to ask questions about your kidney health.

Categories Health, Kidney Diet, Kundan Kidney Care Centre, Risk Factors

How to Prevent Kidney Stones

If you have ever had a kidney stone you know the experience can be extremely unpleasant.  Did you know that over the course of lifetime, one in ten people will have a kidney stone?

If your doctor suspects you have a kidney stone, you may be asked to have diagnostic tests done.

  1. Blood Testing: Too much calcium or uric acid in your blood could be of concern. Blood test may also help monitor the health of your kidneys.
  2. Urine Testing: A 24 Hour urine collection test may reveal that you are exreting too many stone forming minerals.
  3. Ultra-sound Scanning: Imaging tests may show kidney stones in your urinary tract.
  4. Passed Stones Analysis: Your passed stone may reveal the makeup of your kidney stones.

Prevention of kidney stones may include a combination of lifestyle changes and medication.

Drink Fluid: People with the history of kidney stones are recommended to drink about 2.5 liters of water per day. If you live in a hot dry climate and sweat a lot then you may need to drink even more water so that you produce enough urine. A light and clear urine indicate that you are drinking enough water.

Oxalate-Rich Foods: Your doctor may ask you to prevent oxalate rich foods. Cutting oxalate rich food may sound logical but this  may not be smart for an overall health perspective. Eat and drink calcium and oxalate rich foods together during a meal. Doing so, they are more likely to bind in the stomach and intestines before they kidneys begin processing.

Diet Selection: Reduce the amount of salt and choose non-animal protein sources. Consider using a salt substitute such as herbs or spices.

Manage underlying Medical Problems: Some medical conditions like obesity, high blood pressure and diabetes can raise your risk for kidney stones.

Treatment may be required if the diet and drinking water does not work. Consult us for further information. There are herbal and safer ways to address this problem.

Categories Kidney Disease, Kundan Kidney Care Centre, Risk Factors

Renal Cyst – Go For Herbal Remedies for Kidney Problems

Unlike kidney stones which are solid stone like forms, kidney cysts are fluid-filled pouches that develop on the surface of the kidneys. Kidney cyst is generally non-cancerous and harmless, while some of them are associated with kidney disorders which can lead to complications. They can also develop inside the kidney. When these cysts become large, symptoms such as upper abdominal pain, fever or an ache in your side or back can also take place.

 

Herbal Remedies for Kidney Problems

Generally, you don’t have to worry too much about kidney cysts unless they begin to irritate you. There is no remedy for kidney cysts. However, herbal treatment can help with the kidney function that may be impacted with the cysts.

Herbal Treatment – Kundan Kidney Care Centre provides herbal remedies for kidney problem. The herbs used in the kidney supplements are carefully chosen and have known safety profiles. All the herbal products are safe and have no known side effects. This natural kidney cure can help you reduce creatinine and urea. The herbal products can be taken safely with other prescribed Allopathic medicine for your cyst treatment.

Keep Your Body Hydrated – Drinking sufficient water is highly recommended to those suffering from renal cyst. Water allows your kidneys to perform their job correctly. It is recommended that you drink four liters of water per day. This amount of water will lead to about 1.5 liters of urine which can flush toxins out of the body. You can consider drinking cranberry juice too as it helps with a wide variety of kidney and urinary issues.

Eat Ample of Fruits & Vegetables – The nutritionists always prescribe diet rich in fresh fruits and vegetables. These foods not only have a good fiber content but they also supply the essential vitamins and minerals. Experts recommend eating about four to five cups of fruits and vegetables. However, juice never counts towards your fruit quota because it lacks fiber. Also, leafy vegetables, such as lettuce, should be included in your diet.

Keep a Check on Protein Consumption – At the same time, it is also suggested to maintain a healthy balance of protein in your daily diet. When the body has sufficient amount of protein it enables the kidneys to do extra works. Therefore, including one to one and a half cups of protein in your diet. But make sure it is lean protein so that you do not end up gaining excessive fats.

Stop Smoking – Smoking, fumes from household chemicals and cleaners, and overuse of medicines create extra toxins in the body. This means extra work for your kidneys. Increasing the level of stress on kidneys means the cysts will increase in size. Therefore, always avoid those elements which make the matters worse and lead a healthy and blissful life.

These are some of the best suitable ways to reduce the cysts through its natural processes. Also, the herbal remedies for kidney problems provided by Kundan Kidney Care Centre are all safe and natural. The supplements are all free from steroids and metals. However, if the renal cysts are large enough, then a type of surgery known as a laparoscopy might be needed.

Categories Kidney Disease, Risk Factors

Signs and Symptoms of Diabetes

Do you have the urge to go to the washroom more often than usual? Do you feel thirsty, fatigued and blurred vision? These are the tell tale signs of diabetes. Diabetes is having a high level of sugar in the blood as a result of not enough secretion or insulin resistance. There are mainly two different types of diabetes that are similar in their elevated blood sugar but different in many ways.

Type 1 Diabetes: This is caused by the Pancreas inability to produce insulin. It is usually diagnosed in children and young adults. The symptoms of Type 1 diabetes are quite obvious, frequent urination, increased thirst, weight loss, irritability and other mood changes, fatigue and weakness, blurred vision and extreme hunger.

In addition, having Type 1 diabetes increases your risk for many serious complications, kidney disease, nerve damage, blindness, heart disease and cuts and bruises that are slow to heal.

Treatment for Type 1 disease can be managed with intermediate or long-acting insulin. There are also safe and herbal alternatives available to deal with this disease.

Type 2 Diabetes: This is usually developed in men and women over the age of 40. The main reason could be obesity and lack of physical activity. In this type – the Pancreas still produces insulin, however, the body cannot use it efficiently. Pear shape people with a lot of fat around their abdomen are at greater risk of developing diabetes.

Type 2 can start at an early age if you are overweight, sedentary, affected by high blood pressure, from a family with a history of Type 2 diabetes and from an ethnic background that has a higher risk of Type 2 diabetes (African-Caribbean or Asian).

Higher sugar levels can also cause rapid weight loss (10 – 20 lbs) over two or three months.

With diabetes, the kidneys are also working overtime to eliminate the excess sugar and this lead to a loss of calories and this can harm the kidneys.

If you suspect you have Diabetes, it is important to immediately see your doctor. It could be frightening to find out that you have diabetes but you must know that people with diabetes can live a long, healthy and happy lives.

Eat right and exercise. This will keep you healthy.

Categories Kidney Disease, Kundan Kidney Care Centre, Risk Factors

How to lower creatinine

Creatinine is a chemical waste molecule produced from creatine. Roughly 2% of creatine in our body converts to creatinine every day and transported via bloodstream to our kidneys. Most of this creatinine is filtered by the kidneys and removed via urine. Usually creatinine production in our body remains unchanged thus making it a reliable way of identifying the kidney function. A sudden change in creatinine level may indicate the kidney disease or impaired kidney function.

What can cause high creatinine level? Dehydration, ACE inhibitors, high blood pressure, diabetes, thyroid issues, excessive blood loss, taking creatine as a dietary supplement and excessive amounts of red meat can result in higher creatinine levels.

How to lower creatinine level:

  • creatinine level may start to increase if the body is dehydrated. It is recommended to drink plenty of fluid every day. Drinking water means more urination that means more creatinine released from the body.
  • healthy diet can play a vital role in controlling the creatinine level. Add fresh fruits and vegetables to your diet, prefer whole wheat and include oats in your diet. Avoid food items with refined sugar, replace beverages with water.
  • avoid excessive creatine supplements. Taking creatine supplements could be potentially dangerous. It increases pressure on the kidneys and can cause heart issues and muscle cramps.
  • salt (sodium) can cause body to retain more water which leads to less frequent visits to the washroom. Stay away from foods with excessive salt.

If you are suffering from the kidney disease then it is best to consult your doctor and a dietitian to have your diet planned. We at Kundan Kidney Care Centre offer a free assessment and offer a safe and alternative method of treatment for kidney disease.

Categories Health, Kidney Disease, Risk Factors

CKD Mangement

This article can help in understanding some general issues and the management of Chronic Kidney Disease:

Issues:

  • It is important to understand that CKD is a spectrum of disease. Mild CKD is common and rarely progresses to a more severe form and it does not necessarily equate to renal dialysis.
  • Understand eGFR and monitor it on a regular basis to ensure that the condition is not deteriorating.
  • Understand the link between diabetes and hypertension – maintaining a tight control can limit the damage of the kidneys.
  • People with CKD should exercise, achieve a healthy weight and must stop smoking.
  • A good glycaemic control should be achieved in patients with diabetes mellitus and CKD.
  • Review all prescribed medicines regularly.

Already Diagnosed: eGFR is less than 60

  • Review GFR and assess the rate of deterioration.
  • Review all medication including the over-the-counter drugs.
  • Haematuria and proteinuria suggest glomerulonephritis, this may progress rapidly.
  • Look for sepsis, heart failure, hypovolaemia, palpable bladder.
  • Repeat serum creatinine measurement to exclude rapid progression.
  • Seek professional help – there are safe and natural options to address this disease.

Monitoring:

  • Based on the severity of the disease, eGFR should be monitored regularly.
  • Have the level of proteinuria assessed at least annually.
  • Proteinuria should be assessed by measurement either of the PCR or ACR, ideally on an early-morning urine specimen.
  • An abnormal eGFR should prompt a clinical assessment and a repeat test within two weeks should be done to assess the progression.
  • Patient with CKD should have an annual assessment of their cardiovascular risk factors, lipid profile, BMI, exercise, alcohol and smoking habits.
  • Keep the systolic blood pressure below 140mm Hg and the diastolic blood pressure below 90mm Hg.
  • Routinely measure calcium, phosphate, parathyroid hormone (PTH) and vitamin D levels.
  • Renal dietitian should be consulted to carry out a dietary assessment and give individualized information and advice on diet.

Complications:

  •  Anemia: left ventricular hypertrophy, fatigue, impaired cognitive functioning.
  •  Coagulopathy.
  • Hypertension: left ventricular hypertrophy, heart failure, stroke, CVD.
  • Calcium phosphate loading: cardiovascular and cerebrovascular disease, arthropathy, soft tissue calcification.
  • Renal osteodystrophy: disorders of calcium, phosphorus and bone, most commonly osteitis fibrosa cystica.
  • Bone changes of secondary hyperparathyroidism: bone pain and fractures.
  • Neurological: uraemic encephalopathy, neuropathy including peripheral neuropathy.
  • Dialysis amyloid: bone pain, arthropathy, carpal tunnel syndrome.
  • Fluid overload: pulmonary oedema, hypertension
  • Malnutrition: increased morbidity and mortality, infections, poor wound healing.
  • Glucose intolerance due to peripheral insulin resistance.
Categories Health, Kidney Diet, Kidney Disease, Risk Factors

Red meat may trigger kidney malfunction – study

Crispy bacon, a juicy rib eye steak, or beef burger – these mouthwatering red meat delicacies have long been accused of being bad for health. Unfortunately, a new study based on 15 years of research now claims to back that theory with scientific evidence.

Risk of kidney failure significantly increases with constant red meat consumption, a new study conducted at the National University of Singapore suggests.

“Red meat intake is strongly associated with ESRD risk [end-stage renal disease, or kidney failure] in a dose-dependent manner,” the study’s abstract says.

More than 60,000 adults from Singapore took part in the long-term research. They were divided into several groups according to how much red meat they consumed. Constant follow-ups showed that around 1,000 participants developed kidney failure.

The people in the group claiming to eat the largest amount of red meat had a 40 percent higher risk of experiencing kidney failure compared to those consuming moderate amounts.

Luckily, not every type of protein has been found harmful to kidneys, and those who look after their muscles can still get their needed protein fix from poultry, fish, eggs, or dairy products, thus reducing the risk.

“Our study shows that red meat intake may increase the risk of ESRD in the general population and substituting alternative sources of protein may reduce the incidence of ESRD,” according to the study.

This, however, doesn’t mean that people should “avoid red meat like poison,” but finding a substitute for at least one meal with red meat a day is not a bad idea, the study’s senior author, Woon-Puay Koh, told Reuters Health in an email letter.

“Current guidelines recommend restricting dietary protein intake in patients with advanced chronic kidney disease to help reduce symptoms and slow progression to end-stage renal disease,” Koh also noted.

An estimated 500 million people suffer from chronic kidney condition, some of whom need constant dialysis procedures or a kidney transplant, researchers noted.

It was previously thought that people with kidney problems who eat red meat on a daily basis could encounter problems with a substance known as urea building up in their bodies, because if a person’s kidney’s aren’t working problem, it is not sufficiently expelled in their urine.

The new study stresses that there is no evidence that red meat causes kidney conditions, but it apparently contributes to the pathological process.

*article source – https://www.rt.com/news/353781-red-meat-kidney-failure/

Categories Health, Kidney Disease, Risk Factors

SEXUALITY AND KIDNEY DISEASE

Can people with kidney disease or kidney failure still enjoy sex?

It’s important to remember that people with kidney failure can have healthy marriages and meaningful relationships. They can fall in love, care for families, and be sexual. Staying intimate with those you love is important. It’s something everyone needs.

Many people think that sexuality refers only to sexual intercourse. But sexuality includes many things, like touching, hugging, or kissing. It includes how you feel about yourself, how well you communicate, and how willing you are to be close to someone else.

There are many things that can affect your sexuality if you have kidney disease or kidney failure — hormones, nerves, energy levels, even medicine. But there are also things you and your healthcare team can do to deal with these changes. Don’t be afraid to ask questions or get help from a healthcare professional.

What if I lose interest in sex?

Your interest in sex may change when you have kidney disease or kidney failure. At first, you may have less interest in sex. This can happen because you need a lot of energy to cope with the physical and emotional changes brought on by your illness. In time, your interest may return to normal.

Some men may find it more difficult to have or keep an erection. This is very common with kidney failure. It can result from the side effects of medicine, having a buildup of toxic wastes in the blood that may not be fully removed by dialysis, or other things. Many of these problems can be treated. Don’t be afraid to ask questions or get help from a healthcare professional.

Emotions can also affect sexual functioning. This includes stress, depression, nerves, fear of disability or death, marriage problems, and much more. For some people, having kidney disease may cause physical changes that can make them feel less attractive. This can also affect sexual interest. Couples who find that their sex lives are changing should talk to their doctor or social worker. Many of these problems can be treated.

Is sexual intercourse safe for kidney patients?

Some patients and their partners may worry that sexual activity could cause the patient’s death or harm the dialysis access or transplanted kidney. No limitations need to be placed on kidney patients sexually. If sexual activity does not place pressure or tension on the access site, it will not cause damage. Fear can cause people to avoid sexual activity needlessly.

After receiving a transplant, it is important to wait until the scar has begun to heal. Once your doctor says it is all right to resume sexual activity, there is no reason to worry about damaging the transplanted kidney.

For some couples, sexual intercourse is not possible. Some may feel that sex is not as important as it once was. Activities such as touching, hugging, and kissing provide feelings of warmth and closeness even if intercourse is not involved. Professional sex therapists can recommend alternative methods.

How will I know whether sexual problems are due to physical or emotional causes?

This requires a complete medical, psychological, and sexual history of you and your partner. Medicines should be reviewed for sexual side effects and changed if possible. Blood tests should include hormone levels and blood sugar levels to check for diabetes. Men can be checked to see if nerve and blood supply to the penis are good and if they can have an erection. If no physical problem is found, an emotional cause must be considered.

What can be done if the problem is physical?

Several options are available for men whose penis will not get or stay hard (erection). Penile implant surgery places inflatable or semi-rigid rods into the penis. In some cases, surgery can improve blood flow to the penis. If the man does not want surgery, male hormones may be given. Oral and injectable medications can cause an erection. External suction devices can make the penis hard enough for intercourse, but they require time and hand strength. Doctors with special training in impotence can give information on all options as well as their advantages, disadvantages, and side effects.

Women patients usually have less vaginal wetness and may have pain during sexual activity. Lower hormone levels can cause vaginal dryness. Use of a water-soluble vaginal lubricant can lower or stop pain associated with intercourse. Do not use petroleum jelly because it can increase the risk of infection. Some women may be unable to have a climax or may need more time to get “turned on” because of loss of energy, hormone changes, or medications for high blood pressure. A change in blood pressure medicine or extra hormones may be needed. Your doctor can provide information on options.

What can be done if the problem is psychological?

Feeling worried, anxious, or depressed is normal when faced with a serious loss such as kidney disease and kidney failure. These emotions can cause loss of energy and lower interest in many activities, including sex. If a sexual problem does occur, embarrassment and guilt often follow. Fear that the problem will happen again may cause the person to shy away from sexual situations. Relaxation exercises can help to control these fears. Regular physical exercise and activity help keep the mind busy and can improve physical condition and body image. If sexual problems continue, sex therapy can help. Even if the problem is psychological, some of the treatment options mentioned for physical problems may be helpful.

Can sex therapy help?

Sex therapy deals with the sexual problems of couples and individuals. The first step in sex therapy may be sexual education for the individual or couple. The therapist may assign activities to be done at home. These include communication exercises, stress reduction activities, and practicing ways of improving skills in giving and receiving enjoyable touches. Sex therapy can help with problems such as low sexual interest, trouble in reaching climax or reaching climax too soon, pain during sexual activity, and erection difficulties. Therapy also can help a person work through the effects of chronic illness on sexual functioning.

A sex therapist can be a psychiatrist, psychologist, physician, or social worker. Look for someone who is licensed and who has advanced training and experience in sexuality and sexual problems. Charges vary and may be covered partly by insurance.

What can kidney patients do to help themselves?

Take an active role in learning about kidney disease and treatment. Follow the prescribed diet and fluid limits. Take all medications properly and tell the doctor of any side effects. Ask for an exercise program to help muscle tone, strength, and endurance. Your doctor and dietitian can suggest a weight gain or loss program, if needed. Lead a healthy lifestyle. Be aware of other things that could affect your sexual functioning, such as drinking too much alcohol and smoking.

What about having children?

Men with kidney disease or on dialysis can successfully father children. However, for women with kidney disease, pregnancy can lead to problems. A new baby is a joy for any family. But pregnancy can put a lot of stress on your body. If you have kidney disease or kidney failure, it can put you and the health of your unborn child at risk. It can also make your kidney disease worse. If you are thinking of becoming pregnant, you should discuss it carefully with your doctor.

* Article sourced from National Kidney Foundation.

Categories Health, Kundan Kidney Care Centre, Risk Factors

Exercise and Type 2 Diabetes

One of the most undemanding and the most workable ways to knock over blood sugar amount, eliminate the dangers of “cardiovascular disease,” and perk up health and welfare in general is exercise.

In spite of that, in today’s inactive world where almost every indispensable job can be carried out online, from the ergonomic chair in front of a computer, or with a streaming line of messages from a fax machine, exercising can be a hard argument to win over.

The Weight of Exercise

Everyone should exercise, yet the health experts tells us that only 30% of the population gets the recommended thirty minutes of daily physical activity, and 25% are not active at all. In fact, inactivity is thought to be one of the key reasons for the surge of type 2 diabetes., because inactivity and obesity promote insulin resistance.

The good news is that it is never too late to get moving, and exercise is one of the easiest ways to start controlling your diabetes. For people with type 2 diabetes in particular, exercise can improve insulin sensitivity, lower the risk of heart disease, and promote weight loss.

Type 2 Diabetes

Diabetes is on the rise. The number of people diagnosed with diabetes every year increased by 48% between 1980 and 1994. Nearly all the new cases are Type 2 Diabetes, or adult-onset, the kind that moves in around middle age. Symptoms of Type 2 Diabetes include increased thirst, appetite, and need to urinate; feeling tired, edgy, or sick to the stomach; blurred vision; tingling or loss of feeling in the hands.

The causes of type 2 diabetes are complex and not completely understood, although research is uncovering new clues at a rapid pace.

However, it has already been proven that one of the reasons for the boom in type 2 diabetes is the widening of waistbands and the trend toward a more deskbound and inactive lifestyle in the United States and other developed countries. In America, the shift has been striking; in the 1990s alone, obesity increased by 61% and diagnosed diabetes by 49%.

For this reason, health experts encourage those who already have type 2 diabetes to start employing the wonders that exercise can do for them. Without exercise, people have the tendency to become obese. Once they are obese, they have bigger chances of accumulating type 2 diabetes.

Today, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services reports that over 80% of people with type 2 diabetes are clinically overweight. Therefore, it is high time that people, whether inflicted with type 2 diabetes or not, should start doing those jumping and stretching activities.

Getting Started

The first order of business with any exercise plan, especially if you are a “dyed-in-the-wool” sluggish, is to consult with your health care provider. If you have cardiac risk factors, the health care provider may want to perform a stress test to establish a safe level of exercise for you.

Certain diabetic complications will also dictate what type of exercise program you can take on. Activities like weightlifting, jogging, or high-impact aerobics can possibly pose a risk for people with diabetic retinopathy due to the risk for further blood vessel damage and possible retinal detachment.

If you are already active in sports or work out regularly, it will still benefit you to discuss your regular routine with your doctor. If you are taking insulin, you may need to take special precautions to prevent hypoglycemia during your workout.

Start Slow

For those who have type 2 diabetes, your exercise routine can be as simple as a brisk nightly neighborhood walk. If you have not been very active before now, start slowly and work your way up. Walk the dog or get out in the yard and rake. Take the stairs instead of the elevator. Park in the back of the lot and walk. Every little bit does work, in fact, it really helps a lot.

As little as 15 to 30 minutes of daily, heart-pumping exercise can make a big difference in your blood glucose control and your risk of developing diabetic complications. One of the easiest and least expensive ways of getting moving is to start a walking program. All you need is a good pair of well-fitting, supportive shoes and a direction to head in.

Indeed, you do not have to waste too many expenses on costly “health club memberships,” or the most up-to-date health device to start pumping those fats out. What you need is the willingness and the determination to start exercising to a healthier, type 2 diabetes-free life.

The results would be the sweetest rewards from the effort that you have exerted.

Categories Kidney Diet, Kidney Disease, Kundan Kidney Care Centre, Risk Factors

Dealing With Anemia From Kidney Disease

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Ask your doctor if diet can increase your iron levels

If you think the kidneys have little to do with the composition of your blood, think again. There are reasons why anemia (a lack of sufficient red blood cells) is a problem that plagues kidney disease patients. It isn’t just that kidneys filter wastes from the blood and flush them from the body. The fact is that the kidneys themselves are partly responsible for the blood’s very composition.

Kidneys play an active role in maintaining the body, and one way is to produce a hormone called erythropoietin, or EPO. This hormone signals your body to create more red blood cells. But of course, when the kidneys become compromised, they are less able to make the hormone. And virtually inevitably, those with kidney disease will develop anemia as a result.

How severe the anemia will be, and how early it becomes noticeable, depends on several other factors:

  • whether the person is female;
  • whether the person is of African descent;
  • whether they have diabetes;
  • which of the five stages of kidney disease they are currently in.

As soon as someone shows slight signs of kidney problems, it’s a good idea to have blood tests as well, to find out if there’s already an issue with anemia. In fact, regular blood tests are a good idea anyway, because sometimes anemia is someone’s first sign that they even have kidney disease in the first place. But whether the kidney problems were diagnosed first, or the anemia, this problem can’t just be left untreated. A lower supply of red blood cells makes the heart work harder, and this can lead to heart disease. And that’s the last thing someone needs when they’re already dealing with kidney disease.

Treatment for anemia needs to happen in conjunction with treatments for the kidney disease. Usually the doctor will prescribe drugs called erythropoiesis-stimulating agents, or ESAs. These injections made under the skin help the body create more red blood cells. And since iron is also needed for making the cells, the patient will need iron pills, and might also want to eat more iron-rich foods.

Nobody should have to fight through the lethargy and weakness of anemia while engaged in a primary fight against kidney disease. And nobody should add heart disease to that battle either, by ignoring the anemia. These three conditions are closely intertwined, so if the anemia can be dealt with, it can only help both the heart and the kidneys as well.